The 36th Blogger of Shaolin

3 notes

lakeryellowlambo said:

Would you happen to know the name of that weapon? I’m too old to be callin that shit a body nunchuck.

Typically it’s called a three section staff. In Japanese it’s know as a sansetsukon and, in Chinese, a sanjiegun.

Most people refer to it as any play on “three section staff” such as three sectional staff or three sectioned staff.

Filed under lakeryellowlambo Three section staff

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thebigrascal asked: Sonny Chiba. What's your opinion of him? I know who the man is and of his legend, but I've never seen any of his films, except Storm Riders, which isn't even HIS film (and we all know Kill Bill don't cut it). Is he worth checking out? Will the Street Fighter series give a chop-socky-head like me any thrills? Mind you, I do like stuff like the Lady Snowblood series. Basically, should I check him out?

Yes, absolutely. I’m not a massive fan of Sonny Chiba and have only seen a few of his films but his “Street Fighter” movies are gory, over-the-top 70’s schlock done right. They’re ridiculous but they’re a lot of fun. As are a number of his other films, I believe.
I mostly stick to Chinese martial arts films so I haven’t wandered too far into Japanese stuff. But, of course, Sonny Chiba is like the Japanese Bruce Lee. A true icon.

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Yuen Wah is a legend. Best know by most people for his role in “Kung Fu Hustle,” he’s actually be a staple stuntman and actor in kung fu cinema for decades.
He studied Peking Opera along with Sammo Hung, Yuen Biao and Jackie Chan and was Bruce Lee’s body double in “Enter the Dragon.”

Granted, his heyday is behind him but it’s just been revealed (in this article) that this LEGEND of martial arts movies currently makes $323 a month.
That’s fucking bonkers. The guy is 63, has etched his legacy in the genre and yet has to take bit roles and cameos just to make it through a month. A guy who’s been in certified classics like “Wheels on Meals” and “Police Story 3” now makes significantly less money than the American minimum wage.

When asked why he doesn’t raise his prices, he said…

“Increase the price? Who’s going to hire you if you increase the price, I’ll take any project. It’s fine as long as I can get by.”

When Tom Cruise retires, he’ll be sitting on a fortune. Sean Connery’s been retired for a decade and is still worth $300 million.
It’s ridiculous that someone this iconic should be scraping by. Such sad fucking news considering, only ten years ago, he was tickling funny bones and pulling off amazing fight work in “Kung Fu Hustle.”

Filed under Yuen Wah Broke Icon Legend Kung fu cinema Kung fu film Kung Fu Hustle Martial arts

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dropthebasslikeacid:

lysergiocacid:

inkaholicshane:




Bruce Lee plays ping pong with nunchucks like a boss



this is that shit you reblog every single time you see it on your dash. this man is a beast.

I can’t not reblog this.

This is that shit that makes you wanna break cinderblocks with your hands.

I will forever re-blog and ruin this. This ISN’T Bruce Lee. This is all CGI and that dude is a stand-in.
It’s a Nokia commercial that can be watched in full here.
Not to be too much of a naysayer, but if you think Bruce Lee could play ping pong with nunchaku, you’re sadly mistaken.

dropthebasslikeacid:

lysergiocacid:

inkaholicshane:

Bruce Lee plays ping pong with nunchucks like a boss

this is that shit you reblog every single time you see it on your dash. this man is a beast.

I can’t not reblog this.

This is that shit that makes you wanna break cinderblocks with your hands.

I will forever re-blog and ruin this. This ISN’T Bruce Lee. This is all CGI and that dude is a stand-in.

It’s a Nokia commercial that can be watched in full here.

Not to be too much of a naysayer, but if you think Bruce Lee could play ping pong with nunchaku, you’re sadly mistaken.

(via dianarossweave)

Filed under Bruce Lee Fake

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Sammo Hung, Jackie Chan and Yuen Biao in what some consider their greatest film, “Wheels on Meals.”

Fun fact: The film was originally called “Meals on Wheels” (which makes much more sense) but, at the time, a bunch of Hong Kong movies beginning with the letter ‘M’ had bombed. Being superstitious, the film studio decided to flip the first and last words and the film ended up being a success.

Filed under Sammo Hung Jackie Chan Yuen Biao Wheels on Meals Stills Kung fu cinema Kung fu film

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thebigrascal asked: We once spoke of our fondess for characters calling their attacks out/naming thier moves just before attacking, mainly in shapes films What film(s) would you say does this the heaviest? (The first exchange between Jackie & Lau Kar-Leung in Drunken Master 2 is a prime example of what I'm looking for).

It’s found in a lot of films but the one that immediately springs to mind is the original “Drunken Master.” Especially the original, old school dub. Jackie throws out every technique he can in the final fight and announces pretty much all of them.
Also, “The Mystery of Chess Boxing” is bonkers when it comes to people calling out random shit. The only problem is that it’s a lot more conceptual. “The sky is high, the cloud is low” makes no sense whatsoever and yet it’s still amazing when Ghost Face Killer says. “Wood defeats gold!” Does it? I swear half the things in that film make no sense whatsoever.

Jackie tends to do it in a few films, actually. He describes various snake attacks in “Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow” and, from what I can remember, announces each animal style he uses in “Spiritual Kung Fu.”

It’s mostly found in the non-Shaw independent films of the 70’s. I’m sure films like “Daggers 8,” “Shaolin vs Lama,” “7 Grandmasters” and a boatload of others feature in some way, shape or form.

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muslimgamer asked: Opinion on belt system. I know a lot of 'martial arts school' (look at those quoatation marks!) use this as a cheap excuse to give parents reason to justify paying for it but I also know that the USMC, if I'm not wrong, uses it too. So, legit or not?

It’s as legit as anyone wants it to be. If a good school uses it then that’s awesome. If a bad school uses it…not so much.
I don’t think it comes down to the belt system itself, rather who’s administering it.

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Anonymous asked: Do you know where I can find some good fight choreography´s or kung fu pose/movement references?

I’m not sure I understand. Do you mean a reference guide for choreographing your own fight scenes? Nope, sadly not. You can Google and maybe gather some information but there isn’t really a particular resource.

I’d recommend watching amateur fight scenes on You Tube. Stuff by The Stunt People, Vlad Rimburg and The Young Masters. Watch how they frame their fights, their edits, their movements. You’ll learn a lot, trust me.
Also, take a look at this video. It’s dated as hell but it’s an absolute legend (Lau Kar Leung) talking about angles and how on screen action differs from actual action.

Sorry I can’t help you any more than this. I wish I could as I have a huge interest in choreography myself.
The best thing to do is to get a bunch of friends together and experiment. Try and make, say, a thirty second throwdown. The remake it and remake it until it has the aesthetic you want it to have. Make sure any kinks are ironed out. It’ll be a tough slog but it’ll be worth it and will certainly help when you want to make something longer.
Hey, if you do make something, come off anon and send it to me. I’d love to watch any amateur fight scene and, if you care for my input, I’m always available.